Webstagram: Making Instagram increasingly interactive

If you’ve been using and/or following the story of Instagram, you know that it’s very useful for visual communication and the biggest success story in social media of the past couple years. But you’re also probably aware that it doesn’t lend itself to the easiest institutional interaction since it’s smartphone-based and you’d have to do a lot of searches and navigating to truly take advantage of its potential. Especially if you have a personal Instagram account and an organizational account, you’d have to bounce back and forth, signing in/out, a lot of work for limited return.

Enter Webstagram.

webstagram

Webstagram on grid view.

John Murphy of Brown University mentioned this tool recently at #heweb13 and it was almost as if the crowds parted, sunbeams permeated and birds started singing. Almost. More later on the awesome things John and Brown University do with Instagram images, but first a primer.

To get started, simply visit Web.stagram.com and sign in with your organization’s Instagram name and password. It’s free and easy to do. I did and searched for a #sunyoswego tag. And found … 2,226 entries. Just sitting there, almost none with any college engagement.

Tim fail. Major Tim fail.

Webstagram on list view. Simple start liking and commenting!

Webstagram on list view. Simply start liking and commenting!

But I jumped right in using list view (as above) and liked the appropriate posts and responded amicably. It was as if a whole new world opened up, and I apologize to those dealing with the nascent enthusiasm of the @sunyoswego account in these early days. For those of us with variant names, it’s beautiful because I found stuff under the #oswego tag I couldn’t have easily sifted through via Instagram. It also facilitates searching tags for photos to integrate into Storify or other aggregated storytelling efforts.

Webstagram is that simple to use, and if you run an institutional or organization Twitter account, I highly advise checking it out.

Perhaps no one is using Instagram searches and content as amazingly as Brown University, notably on its #brownuniversity tag. Murphy said they received more than 10,000 photos on that tag in less than a year once they started promoting it! They actively work the tag and when they see an outstanding image, they might ask permission to use it in things like their Scene By You at Brown albums on Facebook (here is their latest beautiful collection), among other uses (even the college’s home page). With Brown’s upcoming bicentennial, Murphy said the college plans to ask alumni users to Instagram photos of old Polaroids from their college years, which should create a beautifully diverse and democratic scrapbook created by its family. That’s really taking user-generated images to a new — and awesome — level.

If you put enough time and resources into Webstagram, the sky (whether blue or featuring a sunset) is the limit in engaging your audience to contribute to your online visual presence. It’s almost a picture-perfect find!

4 Comments

Filed under Web

4 responses to “Webstagram: Making Instagram increasingly interactive

  1. Similar to Webstagram is Statigr.am. It works on the same principle, I believe. We’ve been using Statigr.am but now I’m curious about digging into Webstagram. Thanks!

  2. Love what John and Brown are doing. We’ve been moving in the same direction since I came across it. Curious if you end up liking Webstragram more than Tagboard, Tim? All of the Instagram photos end up in Tagboard, but along with content from the other social networks as well. It’s become my preferred sourcing channel.

  3. Thanks for this insight Tim – super helpful🙂

  4. Tim

    Andrew: I tried to check out Statigram but first it wasn’t working then it required login/buyin just to look around. Then Webstagram stole my heart. The end.

    Eric: Haven’t checked out Tagboard in a long time, will have to give it a look.

    Jackie: Always happy to share!

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