stop begging, start creating (cont.): a very short story

I’ve talked before about how social media accounts should stop begging for users and instead find and post quality content. Saw a very stark example of that with our campus this weekend. At about the same time on Saturday, the following two posts went out, the first from an affiliate site, the other from our main site.

The “please, please like us to reach an arbitrary figure” post goes against the very currency of social media — creating content people want to see, interact with and share. It makes everything about the account itself, and not about the user (and it should be about the user). As you can see, this post scared up 5 likes, no comments, no shares and — surprise! — as of Monday morning, the account still needed 7 likes to reach 2,000. It’s unfortunate because this account is run by smart, creative and very likable people capable of producing outstanding content.

Contrast that with the above image of the mind-bending 3-D chalk art from Art for After Hours, part of our Family and Friends Weekend. By Monday morning, it had 192 likes, 7 comments, 7 shares. While those are a good number of likes, the shares are what I consider the highest level of user engagement — they like it enough to take some kind of ownership and share it with friends. While this was far from our most-shared image, it had more shares than the begging post had likes. Plus this scene was available for any member of the campus community to capture and share.

As my friend Georgy Cohen of Meet Content has pointed out, the most-shared stories are ones to which the initial reaction of users is “wow!” or “whoa!” That was my actual reaction upon seeing the chalk art, and others seeing it in a photo (which honestly didn’t do it justice) felt the same way. No one says “wow!” or “whoa!” over an account begging for more users. Sadly in part because it’s so commonplace.

Consider this cocktail party example: You walk into the party and one person is asking people to like him, while the other is telling interesting stories. Where would you gravitate? Exactly.

I can’t say it enough: If you run a social media account, stop begging and start creating. Look around you for interesting content. It’s quite possibly everywhere. Then share it. It really is that simple.

1 Comment

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One response to “stop begging, start creating (cont.): a very short story

  1. Agreed. You want to get a bunch of likes and shares… post great content that tells a story about a unique / memorable experience at your school. Hint: photos are more engaging than wall posts for Facebook Pages. Are you a big sports school? Find photos of the “craziest fans” faces painted, dressed in costume. Do you have an idyllic campus that your alumni remember fondly? Share a picture of a landmark building covered in snow:

    A photo expressing school spirit in a unique way or unique setting never hurts:
    St. Bonaventure Flag during a Today Show episode at the Olympics

    O-H-I-O carved into a pumpkin by an Ohio State fan

    Unless you’re approaching some significant milestone (e.g., 1 million fans) or competing with another school, asking people to like your page just because doesn’t seem that compelling.

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