Tag Archives: yelp

5 (+1) keys to social media platform adoption.

I clearly spend an inordinate amount of time thinking about social media platforms and explaining them to others. Part of this involves pondering why some catch on easily and others don’t — a combination of factors defying a simple recipe. Yet I’d propose at least five key factors driving user adoption of any social media platform: usefulness, usability, user interactivity, sharability and sustainability.

Usefulness: Is it clear what you can do with it? You don’t need much of an elevator speech to explain why folks use Facebook. Not everyone gets the appeal of Twitter, even in more than 140 characters; you have to learn by doing. Proponents would compare LinkedIn to a powerful, interactive rolodex. On YouTube, you share and watch video. Geosocial services like Foursquare and Yelp that offer reviews and tips make plenty of sense for those visiting another city, whereas Gowalla makes more sense if you just want to know what’s around. Innovative tools like Yelp’s monocle — a visual augmented reality layer that shows metatags of what’s around it — could serve as true differentiation as the market shakes out.

Usability: How easily can you take a desired action? Honestly, this is a huge key to why Facebook is so large a juggernaut it’s worrisome and MySpace a punchline. I could never find anything easily on MySpace, and other user pages were run-screaming-from-the-room horrible. Facebook offers a clean and consistent look with commands brilliant in their simplicity — “Add As Friend,” “View Photos of ____,” “Comment.” Twitter offers great ease of use (unless there’s a fail whale sighting). The often-poor user interface, clunky navigation and various glitches among the geosocial services (as described elsewhere) may hold them back at this point. Communities like YouTube and LinkedIn could use some navigational streamlining but are overall fairly facile.

User Interactivity: How easily can you interact with other users? No problem on Facebook — you can comment on photos, comment on status updates, comment on comments, etc. With Twitter, it’s as easy as replying with an @ or DMing for more privacy. Comments and replies are easy on YouTube. In terms of LinkedIn, since I use other connective media more, I have yet to find any reasons to interact with anyone (YMMV). With geosocial services, interaction is often more passive at this point, users more likely to read tips and reviews in Foursquare and Yelp. Although I guess ousting someone else as a Foursquare mayor represents an unusual wrinkle on interactivity.

Sharability: How easily can you share information within the community or export into other communities? Facebook and Twitter are on a different plane here, as not only is it easy to share or retweet within them, but the likes of Foursquare, Gowalla and Yelp rely on appearing in Facebook or  Twitter feeds for their introduction, visibility and viability. Indeed, the main backlash on Foursquare is the annoying flood of checkins, badges and mayorships into other users’ Facebook and Twitter streams. I’m not sure how to share anything from LinkenIn, nor can I think of any reasons I’d want to. YouTube exports anywhere and everywhere.

Sustainability: Why would you want to stay engaged with it? Again, with Facebook, ongoing interaction is self-evident. With Twitter, this creates a quick divide and pundits note how many people abandon it. But this isn’t entirely bad: Those who want to use Twitter as a megaphone will not find it sustainable (fortunately), while those who understand it as a party-line telephone will keep using it. A challenge I’ve had with LinkedIn is that I find content from my contacts on other platforms already. Foursquare’s sustainability gains a boost from its mayor function, as people check into places to try to gain mayorship of that establishment. And with 24 hours of new video uploaded per minute on YouTube, there’s always something new.

Across all these runs an additional factor toward any platform’s tipping point: critical mass. A key reason people adopt Foursquare over Gowalla or Yelp is the simple fact they see more of their friends on Foursquare (and sharing this via Twitter and Facebook). After all, a key draw of social media is the ability to interact with others, so knowing friends are already there will increase adoption of any given community.

What do you think? Did I miss any key factors?

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geotagging: the next big thing? part iv: yelp = enter augmented reality.

Imagine you’re in another city and looking for a bite to eat. You pull out your mobile device, hold it up and on the screen appears names of the restaurants surrounding you, with their types, ratings, approximate meal costs and directions. Then clicking on a specific restaurant’s link takes you to more information.

Sound like something out of the future? The future is now, thanks to Yelp … if you have the right device. If you don’t have the right device, it still works pretty well.

Currently, Yelp’s monocle function (described above) is only available on devices like the iPhone 3.0 with a video interface. Developers even had to hide the function as an Easter Egg to get it into Apple’s app store, noted in this Mashable article (includes video of monocle at work). As the monocle function gains in availability, providing an entree to the sure-to-be-big augmented reality phase of geotagging, this could really be a game-changer.

Whether or not you have the monocle, Yelp provides all kinds of information on businesses around you. If you’re looking for fast food, elegant slow food or ethnic fare — or other goods and services — you’ll find options under the Nearby function. A starred review system tells what users think. A $ rating system tells what to expect to pay. A compass-like function, tied to your device’s GPS, tells you where to find your destination.

Since Yelp generates the basic information, you don’t have to worry about the bad data issue of Gowalla. And while Foursquare also offers reviews, Yelp tying to your phone’s GPS — to say nothing of potential augmented reality feature — gives this service a leg up despite Foursquare’s greater current popularity.

Yelp also lets users in on special deals available to its businesses partners. “I like that instead of having one ‘Mayor’ like Foursquare, Yelp allows people to become ‘regulars’ at locations,” explains Seth Odell, media relations assistant at UCLA. “It seems like a lot more fun and inclusive, rather than exclusive, approach.” Let me reiterate this key point: Social media works best when inclusive, so that Foursquare skews toward exclusive benefits for the singular mayor of any location runs against the grain.

Fred Vigeant, assistant general manager for content at Oswego NPR affiliate WRVO, has the monocle function but also enjoys creating reviews for others. “I like how I’m helping build up a local network of reviews in our area” to help if “someone from out of town comes to visit and is looking for some information,” he says. “I also like how you can follow certain reviewers. This feature is nice because maybe they have similar taste and can suggest new places to explore.”

Jacqueline Lalande, who works for Solar Energy Systems in New York City, likes “that the reviews are passion based. You have to really care about how much you liked or didn’t like a place if you’re going to get online and post about it. This is a great way to get a feel for a place, as I like that it’s an everyday person’s opinions.”

But while reviews are easy to find, Yelp (very curiously) won’t let you contribute one from your mobile device. “While I can check in and upload a location photo, Yelp doesn’t allow people to write reviews from their phones,” Odell notes. “If I could make my entire Yelp experience mobile (writing and commenting on reviews, uploading photos, etc.) then I would be more likely to do that while at the location and to check in in the process.”

A drawback for higher education is the service’s genesis via Yellow Pages listings. Generally, a college has only limited listings, thus you would have to work with Yelp to get them to generate listings for, say, dining halls, specific schools and departments, residence halls or other aspects of the campus experience … if you’re brave enough for the feedback. I haven’t yet seen a college who has worked this out. And it’s worth noting Yelp has four different overall listings for my college with different names, which certainly leads to confusion and data diffusion.

As for benefits to businesses, some exist already. “Finding reviews of bars and restaurants are the most utilized function. However, I could see a use for other businesses to jump on the program and … see what the crowd thinks of them,” Vigeant says.

“Businesses are already on there and I like that,” Lalande notes. For colleges and harder-to-define services, Yelp has potential, as “it’s almost like a message board … which has its good and bad points. You’ll get your good comments, but you also run the risk of people giving it a bad rating.”

For businesses as well as higher ed, Odell thinks Yelp — and geotagging in general — still isn’t there yet. “People talk about how rewarding people for checking in is attractive to businesses, but I don’t see that,” he says. “Sure it’s nice to encourage customers to become regulars, but in the end you are providing discounts to a customer who was already coming. The only way I see advertising becoming successful is if they approach it as a way to attract new customers, not simply build a stronger bond with current ones.”

Building bonds — with other users and with establishments favorite and unfamiliar — remains the big draw to geotagging, so we can’t underestimate its future. Since, as this series has shown, each comes with different drawbacks, neither Foursquare, Gowalla nor Yelp seem like that killer app that will become that next service with Facebook-style popularity. But the potential is there if some of these apps merge. Or if a developer can build a better mousetrap, the world may beat a bath to his or her door … since, with geotagging, we’ll know exactly where to find it.

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geosocial media: the next big thing? part i: mapping ourselves.

“By mapping the world, we have mapped ourselves.” — James Burke, The Day The Universe Changed, 1985

Of the many brilliant utterances scientific historian and great mind Burke has uttered, that line most resonates with me, 25 years later. While I had a chance to ask him about the quote a few years ago (barely maintaining my composure), he modestly brushed it off as not terribly prophetic. Yet the rise of the Internet, the iPhone and GPS has changed the game … and the almost-certain future explosion of geosocial services will take it further. We have mapped ourselves and then some.

By geosocial, I refer to mobile services tied to your smartphone that allow you to interact with your physical environment and other users. With services like Foursquare and Gowalla, you can create or check into spots at your favorite bar, cafe or restaurant and write and/or read reviews for these spaces. A more advanced platform like Yelp also allows for augmented reality, where you can use more advanced portable devices to “see” metatags on the spaces around you and touch links for more information.

The benefits to users are obvious. If you’re bouncing around Brooklyn looking for the best brews or seeing Seattle’s SoDo seeking the most sumptuous sushi, there is indeed an app for that. Your iPhone’s GPS or other markers can give you a listing of what’s nearby, which can be sorted further by category, and find out the best options via user reviews. If you’re a business, this is an opportunity for customers you didn’t know existed.

When a user checks into a location via Foursquare, Gowalla or Yelp, they can push this information to their Twitter or Facebook accounts, thus providing promotion to the establishment they’re visiting and the geotagging service itself. Thus the viral nature of social media spreads the word … but, as a double-edged sword, sometimes irritates the receivers. As my friend Laura Parisi puts it aptly: “All I know is that people updating about being at the Target on Elm Street in my Twitter feed makes me want to stop using Twitter.” To be fair, the push is an optional feature, but we’ll discuss more in a later episode.

Of course, all advances come with potential drawbacks. I often explain these services to people whose immediate response is: “But what if someone gives us a bad review?” To which the best reply might be: “Um, run a business in such a way you please your customers?” Others note that by declaring you’re out on the town or out of town, you’re announcing Please Rob Me! to burglars.

Concerns real and imagined aside, what’s clear is that the geotagging market will only get larger and larger as services continue to attract more customers (Twitter-type growth is not unimaginable), smartphones gain more technology and developers continue advancing platforms. The next installments of this blog series will look at the three biggest services currently on the market.

- Part II will review Foursquare, the most popular.
- Part III will explore Gowalla, probably the most user-friendly.
- Part IV will look through Yelp, which has the potential to be the biggest game-changer.

I’ve tapped some knowledgeable users of each for their feedback, and hope to answer questions along the way. We can all find our way together!

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