Monthly Archives: March 2009

#pancaketweetup.

Looks like the first-ever #pancaketweetup was a multimedia, albeit modest, success. Kudos to co-creator Lane Joplin, whose pancakes looked much better than mine, and the various Twitters and bloggers who participated. There were some waffles, and some people who had to participate late or early, but it was all in good fun. And good food. Even if I learned it’s difficult to make pancakes, take and upload pictures and tweet all at the same time.

Developed a short (1:17) video snippet for a little flavor from Tim’s kitchen:

Photos? You betcha! (A few more in this Facebook photo album.)

The price of New Hope Mills wheat pancake mix went from $1.99 to $3 in between times I bought it? Inconceivable!

The price of the wonderful New Hope Mills whole wheat pancake mix went from $1.99 to $3 in between times I bought it? Inconceivable!

The one and only Brad J. Ward provided a live video stream of making waffles.

The one and only Brad J. Ward provided a live video stream of making waffles.

All the fixin's: Note that I don't use eggs, so I have to experiment between the level of mix and half-n-half for consistency.

All the fixin's: Note that I don't use eggs, so I have to experiment between the level of mix and half-n-half for consistency.

First one was doughy and thick; had to adjust by adding more half-n-half to the mix.

First one was doughy and thick; had to adjust by adding more half-n-half to the mix.

By the second pancake, the mix was better, but all that multitasking meant they came out a tad burned.

By the second pancake, the mix was better, but all that multitasking meant they came out a tad burned.

Yum!

Yum!

Thanks to all who participated. If you didn’t we hope you’ll join us if we do this again!

EDIT/UPDATE: Lane has posted a great #pancaketweetup video. Enjoy.

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social media with a side of pancakes.

With all the marvelous, momentous and monumental potential behind social media, we can’t forget that it’s inherently about connecting. And, occasionally, silliness. Which brings us to #pancaketweetup this Saturday.

Everyone loves pancakes, and somehow a discussion with @lanejoplin evolved into the first-ever virtual pancake meetup via Twitter, aka #pancaketweetup. Yeah, it has its own hashtag and even online invitation if you’re so inclined (everyone everywhere is invited, cuz that’s how social media is).

By now if you’re still reading, you’re asking one of two questions: 1) How do I participate? or 2) What the hell are you talking about? I’ll try to answer both questions at once.

The #pancaketweetup is a virtual meetup this Saturday (March 7) at 10:30 a.m. eastern. Essentially anyone who wants to be involved needs only do two things: 1) make pancakes (yum!) and 2) share the experience in some way via social media. Real-time would be optimal, such as discussing it (briefly, obviously) on Twitter or Facebook, posting a picture of the pancake process on TwitPic and/or Facebook and/or Flickr, blogging about it, making a video or … well, other ways I probably haven’t thought up. Contact me here or on Twitter if you have other questions.

Consider it a low-stress, high-taste way to meet and interact with other neat (so we think) people across the Webiverse. And a chance to eat pancakes! Yummy yummy pancakes! Are you in? Are you hungry?

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less news than we bargained for.

Earlier today came the official announcement of the end of an era, on Syracuse’s WTVH-5 ceasing news operations and laying off 40 loyal employees. This hits home for me, because 5 is the TV news I’ve watched since I was a young boy, an outlet that helped interest me in journalism and where I had my most influential internship.

The announcement tries to position it as 5′s newsroom merging with that of neighbor and former rival WSTM-3, but it essentially ends an institution with a proud tradition. TV5 was SUNY Oswego grad Al Roker’s first professional weatherman gig. When I interned there, one of the nicest guys was Mike Tirico, now well known as a lead announcer for ABC Sports and ESPN. Other TV5 alumni are working jobs all over the country, thankful for the small-market start.

This news came on the heels of the Rocky Mountain News’ abrupt shuttering by parent company Scripps Howard. If you happen to have 20 minutes to spare, the video on the ghost paper’s home page is an engaging yet devastating documentation of the end of a proud and important paper. And the sad thing is that more TV5s and Rockys will join the club of former journalism outlets.

One part where I disagree with the RMN video, and other pundits on this subject, is in the anger and blame directed at bloggers for the demise of journalism. This is misplaced, albeit trendy: While there are some rogue bloggers trying to supplant journalists, most bloggers (and Twitters and Facebookers) trafficking in current events post links to newspaper articles. It’s just a different distribution method, as I don’t know a single blogger who wants to see newsrooms close, or is working toward putting journalists out of work.

If you’re looking for blame, try corporate boardrooms that have bought up all these journalism outlets and see them as lines on a balance sheet … not as the community resources they are. When Scripps Howard gives up after a mere month of trying to find a buyer for the Rocky Mountain News, when Granite Broadcasting decides to phase out 5′s news function, they are merely redlining an expense to keep shareholders happy. That a community with fewer journalism checks on power is a disservice to everyone, that cities shedding jobs now losing news sources they’ve come to trust like friends is one more kick in the gut … these human costs do not fit into the equation. No film at 11, no special edition, just a fade to black.

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